Saturday, June 14, 2014

Legacy

I've been spending time lately working on my family history.  I find it interesting to trace ancestors back in time to see where each branch of my family had their roots.  It makes for an interesting mix that contributed to my children's heritage.

On my side, ancestors came from Scotland, France and Germany.  My children's father's family have roots in Norway and Denmark.  Some came to these shores before there was a United States of America.  Others came here much later, after laws concerning immigration were in place.

No matter their country of origin, all have this in common.

They all arrived here legally.  Not a single ancestor sneaked in through a back door.  All did what the laws required to gain citizenship.  If English was not their mother tongue, they learned the language.  They worked hard to take care of their families.  Some became storekeepers.  Some were lumberjacks.  Others were farmers.  Still others worked on the railroads.  No matter what their trade, they worked.  And when called upon to serve their country, they did so with honor.  What they did not do was stand in line for a handout.

I am grateful to those ancestors who have left behind a legacy of honesty and hard work, of a strong and abiding faith in God and a deep love of country.

I think my father said it best.  When asked what nationality we are, he always replied, "We are American."

14 comments:

  1. Bravo, my dear, Bravo. I have a niece to lived in Germany for a year. The things she had to over come. She even learned to speak German, even though I'm sure many speak English. Adapt or Die.

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  2. Thank you, Rob. I have always had a love for my country. The leaders - not so much. I would much rather pass on to my children that love of country combined with a good work ethic, than to teach them how to work the system to get free stuff. It would have broken my Dad's heart to see where his beloved nation is today.

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  3. What a wonderful project to leave for your children, and your children's children. Nothing nicer than being able to trace one's roots back through time.

    Whilst RMan parents were alive I spent time with them recording the family tree and any information they remembered / wanted to share. My Great Aunt left a family tree for my mother's side of the family - it traced all the way back to 1733 and I have added to that to keep it up to date. One day our children and their children will be grateful for the information - for the history they will be able look up at a touch of a (mouse) button.

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  4. Dani...I feel, as do you, that it is important to know our family history. I wish, now that my parents are no longer with us, that I had spent more time asking them what they knew. None of my descendants are very interested right now, but I have hope that at least one of them will catch the "genealogy bug." After all, I was well past 50 years of age before I caught it!

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  5. I forgot to pass this on my cousin video taped my dad and uncle at Christmas talking about their parents and grandparents and all the other relatives.

    T wish I had gotten more information from my grandma (moms side) about the other relatives.

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  6. Rob...I wish I had had the foresight to do the same. Now it is too late. But I am writing down everything that I can remember, and I am lucky to have a couple of cousins who have shared a lot of information with me. I just don't want all of that knowledge lost.

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  7. I wonder why it is that Scandinavians and Europeans seem to be OK with coming here legally, but Africans, Hispanics, et al don't want to bother?

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  8. Harry...I am not sure of the reasons back when my ancestors immigrated, but these days we are supposed to somehow feel guilty for whatever reasons, and therefore anyone should be allowed to sneak in. You know, white privilege and all of that rot. Well, this European descendant had no privileges and worked hard for every dime, as did my parents and grandparents. And as far as guilt for the sins of my ancestors, well, that's just not happening.

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  9. You father was a fine man...and amen.

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  10. Pat...Thank you. Dad was a good man. He lived to age 93, and I was so lucky to have him that long.
    As far as the rest goes, I am tired to death of the political correctness that expects me to feel shame at being a white Christian. Not gonna happen. I want my grandchildren to feel pride in their heritage, as well they should. I'm ornery that way. :)

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  11. Thank you, Janet. And thanks for stopping by.

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