Saturday, November 6, 2021

"Too soon old...

 too late smart."

That was a favorite saying of my Dad's.  And it certainly applies to me - his oldest daughter.

After 60 years of living with a cup of coffee in one hand and a cigarette in the other, I have quit smoking.

At present I am really cranky and borderline mean.

Like any addiction, this one takes hold of a person and doesn't want to let go.  But I am determined.  

So I am asking your indulgence for a short while until I can at least be civil again.  There is lots of good stuff to read at the blogs in the sidebar.

I hope to return soon, a little less ornery than I am now.  :)

51 comments:

  1. When did you quit smoking? Sorry for your meanness!

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    1. I did not mean to be nosy, but I wondered where you were in the withdrawal.

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  2. You'll be fine; just proof-read! - lol

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  3. BTW, I'll be praying about the smoking, Vicki.

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  4. Hang in there, girl. Think of how much extra money that you will have for prepping, now.

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    1. Thanks, Ozarkana...I hadn't thought about the extra cash, but yeah - I like it. :)

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  5. At least you didn't try to quit the coffee. That stuff gets a real hold on you.

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    1. Ed...The tobacco addiction had to go, but the coffee stays! As my son used to say, "Just give me the coffee and nobody gets hurt." :)

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  6. You go girl. As a good friend used to tell me when I quit drinking --"it's really only for today and you can do it". You can do this.

    But I have to say, quitting smoking was a lot harder for me. I'll be putting you on the top of my prayer list.
    SJ in Vancouver BC Canada

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    1. Thank you, SJ...It is not easy, but I am determined to succeed with this. Right now it is probably a good thing I live alone as I doubt anyone would want to be around my cranky self. :)

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  7. Vicki,

    My grandmother was probably about 67 when she quit. It had to be so hard. I was so proud of her for finally doing it. Your grandchildren will be proud of you, too.

    I have no idea whether this works, but there are lots of anecdotal reports online of using cream of tartar and fresh orange juice (never from concentrate, but no one says why) to aid in quitting smoking. Mix one teaspoon cream of tartar in a glass of fresh orange juice every night before bed for one month.

    Good luck, Vicki! You can do this!

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    1. Jennifer...Thanks for the tip. Fresh oranges are a little hard to find just now, so I guess I will have to tough it out. But even more, I appreciate the vote of confidence. Thank you.

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  8. Good morning. Glad to see that you are trying to kick an expensive habit. Thieves oil blend has been very helpful in curbing addictions. One or two drops on the tongue is sufficient enough to stop a craving. Also cleansing and detoxifying the liver is a critical step in breaking free from your addiction. I have studied natural help for quite a while since my father was diagnosed with colon cancer and the chemo nearly killed him. If you are interested in a liver cleaner let me know. I don't want to make you any grouchier than you are!!! :) Also each time you have a craving exercise will stop that want temporary. We all know that God will play the most important role in this and will be praying that he will intervene each time you have a craving. Best of wishes. Praying for you.

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    1. Morning Sun...Thanks for the advice - it is appreciated. I do not have essential oils and I do have limited mobility, so I am relying mostly on prayer. So far - so good.

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  9. You can do it, Vicki! We’ll be praying for success.

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  10. My grandmother quit smoking late in life after several DECADES of use. One day she just put the pack of cigarettes on the kitchen table. Every time she wanted to smoke she just looked at the pack and said "Who's stronger; me or you?" She never took a drag again.

    YOU GO, VICKI!

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    1. Pete...I am using a method similar to the one your grandmother used. I have a half-smoked cigarette laying where I can see it. When I really want a smoke, I look at it and say, "Not today, you son of a b.....!" Seems to be working so far. :)

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  11. Hi Vicki...tobacco is a 2 part addiction...1 physical and 2 mental. 1 is a week or so and 2 is a few months...Just pass on the mental triggers after the physical craving is done and try replacing the mental thing with other stuff...have a cookie , chocolate , something like that...those small containers of ice cream work well here...keep cigs out of reach , I have know dozens of folks that have quit ( me included ) so you can too...Blessings , Patrick

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    1. Thanks for the advice, Patrick. It is appreciated. So far - so good!

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  12. I know its hard but you can do it. I quit 30 years ago cold turkey its hard but it can be done good luck and one day at a time

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    1. Thanks, Cathy...Not much fun for sure, but worth it!!

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  13. This is something I can relate to. I didn't think I could ever quit smoking but both my husband and myself quit over 25 years ago. No, it wasn't easy and we were both around smokers every day, which didn't help but eventually we influenced both my MIL and FIL to quit smoking and they were about your age at the time. It will be a challenge but with the cost of cigs today, I would think just the total spent on a years worth would be very encouraging and a great motivator. We used to go through a carton every 5 to 6 days, as we both smoked the same brand. It goes without saying, that added up to be a lot of money over a years time. You are a strong woman. I can tell just from reading your blog that you are strong and capable and probably just a little bull headed enough to succeed and put this all behind you. Good luck. I will be thinking of you and sending prayers that you are able to fight this battle as painlessly as possible. The coffee will help. Some people chew gum. Others keep hard candy handy. Keeping as busy as possible will help you not think about it all the time. You have a lot of cheerleaders here that are all rooting for you. Me too. Ranee (MN)

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    1. Rae...Thank you for your kind words of encouragement. They are very much appreciated. I'm not so sure about the 'strong and capable,' but 'bull headed' fits to a T!!

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  14. Vicki~ Here is to your first breaths of FREEDOM!

    Red

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  15. Vicki, you can do this! Sounds like you've got a good determined start on it. I too will be praying for your success.

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    1. Thanks, chipmunk...Prayers are very much needed and appreciated.

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  16. Good for you!!! My sister quit cold turkey about 10 years ago, she was in her 50’s and smoked over two packs a day. (Probably way more). We really worried when her daughter died 4 years ago but she hung in and didn’t start up again. Can’t imagine the benefits to her health since then. You can do this

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  17. Congratulations, Vicki! Good luck and God bless you.

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  18. There will come a time when you will not believe that you ever smoked! As much determination as you have in other areas, I know you can do this!

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    1. Thanks, sbrgirl...If determination translates into stubbornness, I think I have a fighting chance. :)

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  19. Been there, done that. Quite a few times. I didn't have the habit as long as you, but even so... I did OK until about 2-3 weeks then gave in. The last attempt - the one that took, I used nicotine gum and was giving it a real workout one day and bit my tongue so hard it was visibly black and blue. Pissed me off so badly about the gum and the smoking that my stubborn streak... I mean my determination... really kicked in and I've not smoked since. Or chewed gum. Changing accompanying (trigger?) habits also reduced my urge to light up somehow. The hard part was usually the drive to work when I'd usually have the first of the day. Since I couldn't change the drive, I settled for changing the radio station.

    Good luck, I know you can do it. But don't become discouraged if you go back to it - I know of anyone who was successful the first try.

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    1. JustGail...This isn't my first go-around with trying to quit. But I am praying it is my last. Having a stubborn streak may finally be a good thing. :) Thanks for the encouragement!

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  20. Good job Vicki. I know how hard it is. Brace yourself for a couple hard months. If you can do that - you’re off to the races!👍

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    1. Thanks, Glen...Seems like anything worthwhile is never easy! So far - so good.

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  21. Was just thinking of you this morning, Vicki. How goes the battle of the butts?

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    1. Thanks for asking, Pete...So far, I am winning. Still cranky, but determined! Hope to be back to posting soon.

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  23. My husband quit (for the 3d time) and had a tough time. He finally won and that was years ago and he stayed off tho it took him a while not to miss smoking. But I used to take a drag off of his cigarette on occasion and even that I really missed. this stuff is totally addictive. Hang in there.

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    1. Ann...Good for your husband on kicking the habit, though I believe it is more addiction than habit. And thanks for the encouragement. So far - so good!

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  24. After seeing my husband trying to quit several times over a 39 year period, I know its just about the toughest battle to win. It took a stroke to finally hit home. He's got clogged arteries in his brain and around his heart, but bless him, at 79, he still manages to keep active in the garden and keep us in firewood. You've got a lot of people praying for you, and I know you can kick that butt to the curb.

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    1. Thank you so much for your words of encouragement and prayers. It is a tough addiction to get rid of. Good for your husband in conquering it. The biggest motivation for me was hearing my daughter tell me she is proud of me for quitting. I will not disappoint her.

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